APS Rebates

Question: Why is solar power, in houses for example, so expensive yet the solar power in both a watch and calculator isn’t?
So is it practical for everyday use?

Answer: >So is it practical for everyday use<

It depends a lot on your location and the Federal, State, Local, and utility incentives applicable to your area. They are different all over so there is no way anyone can make a blanket statement on solar’s practicality.

To illustrate what I mean, here is a price list for solar in my local area.
http://www.americanpv.com/pdf/res_on/prices.pdf

A 6.45 kW system lists for $35,800.

For that size system, the feds give you a $10,740 tax credit.
The state I live in provides a $1,000 tax credit.

That still leaves over $24,000 to pay.

HOWEVER, my local utility pays $3 per watt or $18,150, thus leaving me to pay only $6410, which makes my payback period 4 years (or less), thus making an investment like this very affordable.

However, the key here is the local utility (APS) rebate. $3 per watt is considerably higher than other utilities. if that rebate were, for example, 1/2 of what it currently is, my price would go up from $6000 to more than $12,000, thus making the payback period long enough (over 10 years) that it would no longer be as practical to do.

So is it practical? For some people it is while for other people in other locations, it is not.